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Move over conventional lighthouses, the holographic lighthouse of the future is here

Research and development has largely changed the way most technologies work these days. Lighthouses are now slowly becoming obsolete. To couple the two together, a French designer, Nicolas Abdelkader of the Studio NAB, has launched hololightkeeper. It integrates the concept of a working lighthouse with holographic projections to serve the same function of an actual lighthouse.

The technology comprises of two parts – The first part is a 30 metre square control center for the actual projections for the lighthouse and the second is the holographs of the lighthouse projected onto a transparent mesh. The transparent mesh captures the light and creates a stable hologram of the lighthouse on the seascape. To retain the operations of the original lighthouse, a lighthouse keeper will be in charge of the projections from inside the cabin. The holographic lighthouse is 25 metre in height and stretches out to a distance of 50 metre fulfilling its duty as a beacon to the boats in the sea.

The cabins are well designed considering the ease and effectiveness of the person who will operate through them. Stainless steel panels have been used for the external framework and are placed on top of concrete and steel piles which are supported by the hard rock in the sea bed.  The cabins are also cost-efficient and environment friendly. Solar panels and wind turbines have been established to provide power and a water desalination plant onsite coverts sea water into drinking water. Wood shavings, commonly known as wood wool, are used to provide insulation to the walls and additional protection is attained through green roofs.

Abdelkader explains that the purpose of bringing forth this innovation was to preserve the historical significance of these lighthouses. It not just provides 3D holographic images but ensures that it introduces modernization in the ancient method of providing pathways to boats.

All Images: © NAB Design Studio

h/t: Inhabitat

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